“classic rock artists that start with f -classic rock albums released in 1976”

The era of metal’s mainstream dominance in North America came to an end in the early 1990s with the emergence of Nirvana and other grunge bands, signaling the popular breakthrough of alternative rock.[248] Grunge acts were influenced by the heavy metal sound, but rejected the excesses of the more popular metal bands, such as their “flashy and virtuosic solos” and “appearance-driven” MTV orientation.[198]

You have some excellent choices, some from when I was little, to some when I was a tweener and then teenager and beyond….Continue with reviving the Good Stuff…..Old drunks and Potheads like it. Well, so do other people, who actually have taste in music. Thanks

Though Judas Priest did not have a top 40 album in the United States until 1980, for many it was the definitive post-Sabbath heavy metal band; its twin-guitar attack, featuring rapid tempos and a non-bluesy, more cleanly metallic sound, was a major influence on later acts.[5] While heavy metal was growing in popularity, most critics were not enamored of the music. Objections were raised to metal’s adoption of visual spectacle and other trappings of commercial artifice,[177] but the main offense was its perceived musical and lyrical vacuity: reviewing a Black Sabbath album in the early 1970s, leading critic Robert Christgau described it as “dull and decadent…dim-witted, amoral exploitation.”[178]

Tried a classic alternative format in ’93 – ’94. A little soon, perhaps, but it was met with a strong positive reaction by listeners who had a modern rock station in their market but didn’t listen to them anymore because they did not like grunge. As Nirvana, Pearl Jam, Soundgarden, etc… dominated modern rock station playlists, these listeners had nowhere to go. These “80’s cutting edge” listeners were not so cutting edge anymore with the turn of the decade (not to mention, when MTV wasn’t playing grunge, they were playing rap). I have noticed that classic alternative works pretty well as a cornerstone in a Triple AAA format, but as a standalone format itself, I believe you are correct Mr. Jacobs.

Personally, I’m a fan of a lot of this stuff, despite the fact it received consistently sporadic airplay in Detroit where I programmed.  Oddly enough, one of my favorite satellite music channels is “1st Wave,” which features a steady diet of bands like New Order, Depeche Mode, and others that Derdyn mentions in his column.  I would bet the folks at SiriusXM would tell us it’s not among the most popular of their themed music formats.

The Eagles also enjoyed astronomical commercial success during their 70s-80s heyday. In 1971 the founding members started out as a backing band for singer Linda Ronstadt; with her blessing, Glenn Frey, Don Henley, Randy Meisner and Bernie Leadon decided to start their own band.

Categories: Heavy metalRock music genresAmerican styles of musicBritish styles of musicEuropean musicEnglish styles of music1960s fads and trends1970s fads and trends1980s fads and trends1990s fads and trends2000s fads and trends

MARK & NEANDERPAUL’S :30 Second Song Challenge, sponsored by Larry H. Miller, Dodge-Ram Peoria, is weekdays @ 7:30 on 100.7 KSLX! Don’t forget about the :30 Second Song Challenge Cheat Sheet at 4pm, weekdays, with Pete Cummings. Pete will play the first 3 songs of the Next Morning’s :30 Second Song Challenge giving you an unfair advantage. Read More »

During the late 1960s, many psychedelic singers, such as Arthur Brown, began to create outlandish, theatrical and often macabre performances; which in itself became incredibly influential to many metal acts.[125][126][127] The American psychedelic rock band Coven, who opened for early heavy metal influencers such as Vanilla and the Yardbirds, portrayed themselves as practitioners of witchcraft or black magic, using dark—Satanic or occult—imagery in their lyrics, album art, and live performances. Live shows consisted of elaborate, theatrical “Satanic rites.” Coven’s 1969 debut album, Witchcraft Destroys Minds & Reaps Souls, featured imagery of skulls, black masses, inverted crosses, and Satan worship, and both the album artwork and the band’s live performances marked the first appearances in rock music of the sign of the horns, which would later become an important gesture in heavy metal culture.[128][129] At the same time in England, the band Black Widow were also among the first psychedelic rock bands to use occult and Satanic imagery and lyrics, though both Black Widow and Coven’s lyrical and thematic influences on heavy metal were quickly overshadowed by the darker and heavier sounds of Black Sabbath.[128][129]

Real classic rock and blues! We are The Halftones, a very experienced classic rock/blues cover band from the Dallas/Ft Worth area. We ‘plug and play’ and give you an authentic classic rock/blues sound. From Stevie Ray to Jimi Hendrix, Led Zeppelin, The Beatles, Cream, Lynyrd Skynyrd, Doors, The Who and Bad Company to Pearl Jam, The Kinks and Red Hot Chili Peppers. We can even tailor a set list to meet your needs. We are available to play festivals, bars/clubs, corporate functions and private… (more)

Brad Delp is right there with Freddie Mercury in his vocal abilities, and their sound is perfect with the rest of everything else. I have more than a feeling that Boston is ranked too low on this list.

“Bohemian Rhapsody” is a prime example of 1970s’ progressive rock. Written by vocalist/pianist Freddy Mercury and performed by Queen, the song is a six-minute suite, including an operatic passage, of all things, and multiple key and tempo changes, and may be the most original of all songs on this stellar list. Not surprisingly, after released, “Bohemian Rhapsody” hit the top of the UK Singles Chart, selling more than nine million copies and kicked butt in the US as well. Astonishingly, the song was re-released in 1992, after the death of Mercury, and did almost as well then. Then in 2004, “Bohemian Rhapsody” was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame. This awesome song is a prime example of the astonishing range of expression in rock and roll!

My approach (which again, as you know) is all-80s, and I have always put the Modern Rock in a category by itself to give those songs prominence against all the other genres. Oddly, the off-balance creates better balance, because many of the Modern Rock titles are fondly remembered from MTV and club play when they were currents.

Beatles-A-Rama!!! The Show! with host Pat Matthews takes you on an incredible journey through the better known Fab 4 classics to their most obscure musical works, along with some great interviews and studio sessions making this show a must for any…

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