“90s songs on classic rock stations _classic rock az”

Yup, an LA thing. Maybe a Left Coast thing, but a market almost had to support a strong Modern Rock station back in the ’80s in order to have a sufficient nostalgic base. And yes, there’s the jock/presentation piece – something that’s too easy to overlook. Thanks, Dan.

In the 2000s, an extreme metal fusion genre known as deathcore emerged. Deathcore incorporates elements of death metal, hardcore punk and metalcore.[280][281] Deathcore features characteristics such as death metal riffs, hardcore punk breakdowns, death growling, “pig squeal”-sounding vocals, and screaming.[282][283] Deathcore bands include Whitechapel, Suicide Silence, Despised Icon and Carnifex.[284]

This song by Aerosmith is included in their album Toys in the Attic which gave the band the breakthrough success they aspired. It still rocks to high heaven, even 40 years after it was first released.

A nationally-syndicated radio show devoted to exploring the wide musical world of America’s best-loved band. The program presents high-quality recordings of the band’s live performances from analog and digital master tapes provided by the Grateful…

However, the genre’s direct lineage begins in the mid-1960s. American blues music was a major influence on the early British rockers of the era. Bands like The Rolling Stones and The Yardbirds developed blues rock by recording covers of classic blues songs, often speeding up the tempos. As they experimented with the music, the UK blues-based bands—and the U.S. acts they influenced in turn—developed what would become the hallmarks of heavy metal, in particular, the loud, distorted guitar sound.[29] The Kinks played a major role in popularising this sound with their 1964 hit “You Really Got Me”.[112]

^ Jump up to: a b c d Fletcher, Rebecca (28 September 2002). “Interview: Chris Rea – MY ROAD FROM HELL; How a near-death experience made singer Chris Rea realise what he really wanted out of life”. Daily Mirror. TheFreeLibrary.com. Retrieved 22 October 2013.

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Pink Floyd’s David Gilmour and Roger Waters are almost as famous for their feuding as they are for their music — and although they were bandmates for nearly two decades, their personality conflicts precluded true collaboration for many of those years. One notable exception: the No. 9 song on o…

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Classic Rock was owned by British bands and a band doesn’t get more British than The Who. With amazing songs such as ‘Pinball Wizard’, ‘My Generation’ and ‘Baba O’Riley’ The Who are one of the best in the genre. Due to death in the band they didn’t make they greatest impact but showing that they can still rock they are still amazing now as they were in the 70s and 80s.

Then we come to Freddie Mercury. A legend among legends. Freddie’s voice was so powerful and had a range that most singers only dream of acquiring. He is listed as one of the greatest frontman in history, which is no surprise to anyone who has seen it in person or on video. His death will be mourned for many more years.

Derdeyn notes many of these bands didn’t get a “fair shake” when they first hit the music scene back in the ’80s.  And certainly here in the States, there were many markets that did not have a true Modern Rock station back then.  Most of these songs didn’t cross over to Top 40, while most mainstream rockers (known in those days as AOR) didn’t touch them.  They were visible on MTV during that time, but less prominently played on FM radio.

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In January 1969, Led Zeppelin’s self-titled debut album was released and reached number 10 on the Billboard album chart. In July, Zeppelin and a power trio with a Cream-inspired, but cruder sound, Grand Funk Railroad, played the Atlanta Pop Festival. That same month, another Cream-rooted trio led by Leslie West released Mountain, an album filled with heavy blues rock guitar and roaring vocals. In August, the group—now itself dubbed Mountain—played an hour-long set at the Woodstock Festival, exposing the crowd of 300,000 people to the emerging sound of heavy metal.[148][149] Mountain’s proto-metal or early heavy metal hit song “Mississippi Queen” from the album Climbing! is especially credited with paving the way for heavy metal and was one of the first heavy guitar songs to receive regular play on radio.[148][150][151] In September 1969, the Beatles released the album Abbey Road containing the track “I Want You (She’s So Heavy)” which has been credited as an early example of or influence on heavy metal or doom metal.[152][153] In October 1969, British band High Tide debuted with the heavy, proto-metal album Sea Shanties.[154][139]

First played by Richard Berry and the Pharaohs, “Louie Louie” is one of the most played rock tunes of all time. In the old days, this was usually the first tune learned by rock guitarists (the chords A, D, Em,D). Often considered a dirty song, though it isn’t – but you know how inventive kids can be – a seemingly endless number of bands have covered this song, often adding a guitar or saxophone solo, but The Kingsmen in 1963 may have produced the most popular version, though the lyrics are barely intelligible, as they often are in rock songs.

According to scholars David Hatch and Stephen Millward, Black Sabbath, and the numerous metal bands that they inspired, have concentrated lyrically “on dark and depressing subject matter to an extent hitherto unprecedented in any form of pop music”. They take as an example Sabbath’s second album Paranoid (1970), which “included songs dealing with personal trauma—’Paranoid’ and ‘Fairies Wear Boots’ (which described the unsavoury side effects of drug-taking)—as well as those confronting wider issues, such as the self-explanatory ‘War Pigs’ and ‘Hand of Doom’.”[55] Deriving from the genre’s roots in blues music, sex is another important topic—a thread running from Led Zeppelin’s suggestive lyrics to the more explicit references of glam and nu metal bands.[56]

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