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Fred, my thought is that such a format would have the best success in a market that had a KROQ (L.A.) or 91X (S.D.) in the 80s. And it would need to be tweaked to encompass artists and songs that were big on the original station and downplay those that were bigger elsewhere.

This is the Real School of Rock! The Original Rock and Roll Podcast. Interviews, music and more from a Rock and Roll Geek. All done with a Metal Sludge, Blabbermouth sense of humor for fans of Aerosmith, Cheap Trick, Wildhearts, Metallica, AC/DC,…

41 Bon Jovi Bon Jovi is a hard rock band formed in 1983, which had a streak of successful albums in the late 1980s. The band originally consisted of lead vocalist Jon Bon Jovi, guitarist Ritchie Sambora (left in 2013), bassist Alec John Such (left in 1994), keyboard David Bryan, and drummer Tico Torres. The band’s …read more.

In a review of Sir Lord Baltimore’s Kingdom Come in the May 1971 Creem, Saunders wrote, “Sir Lord Baltimore seems to have down pat most all the best heavy metal tricks in the book”.[98] Creem critic Lester Bangs is credited with popularizing the term via his early 1970s essays on bands such as Led Zeppelin and Black Sabbath.[99] Through the decade, heavy metal was used by certain critics as a virtually automatic putdown. In 1979, lead New York Times popular music critic John Rockwell described what he called “heavy-metal rock” as “brutally aggressive music played mostly for minds clouded by drugs”,[100] and, in a different article, as “a crude exaggeration of rock basics that appeals to white teenagers”.[101]

The mindset underlying classic rock was regarded by Christgau as politically regressive; he said the music eschewed ironic sensibilities in favor of unintellectual, conventional aesthetics rooted in Victorian era Romanticism, while downplaying the more radical aspects of 1960s counterculture, such as race, African-American music, politics, and pop in the art sense. “Though classic rock draws its inspiration and most of its heroes from the ’60s, it is, of course, a construction of the ’70s”, he wrote in 1991 for Details magazine. “It was invented by prepunk/predisco radio programmers who knew that before they could totally commodify ’60s culture they’d have to rework it—that is, selectively distort it till it threatened no one … In the official rock pantheon the Doors and Led Zeppelin are Great Artists while Chuck Berry and Little Richard are Primitive Forefathers and James Brown and Sly Stone are Something Else.”[22] Regarding the development of classic rock, Christgau points to the compromised socioeconomic security and diminishing collective consciousness of a new generation of listeners in the 1970s and on, who succeeded rock’s early years during baby-boomer economic prosperity in the United States. “Not for nothing did classic rock crown the Doors’ mystagogic middlebrow escapism and Led Zep’s chest-thumping megalomaniac grandeur. Rhetorical self-aggrandizement that made no demands on everyday life was exactly what the times called for.”[22] Shuker attributed the rise of classic-rock radio in part to “the consumer power of the aging post-war ‘baby boomers’ and the appeal of this group to radio advertisers”. In his opinion, classic rock also produced a rock music ideology and discussion of the music that was “heavily gendered”, celebrating “a male homosocial paradigm of musicianship” that “continued to dominate subsequent discourse, not just around rock music, but of popular music more generally.”[19]

According to scholars David Hatch and Stephen Millward, Black Sabbath, and the numerous metal bands that they inspired, have concentrated lyrically “on dark and depressing subject matter to an extent unprecedented in any form of pop music”. They take as an example Sabbath’s second album Paranoid (1970), which “included songs dealing with personal trauma—’Paranoid’ and ‘Fairies Wear Boots’ (which described the unsavoury side effects of drug-taking)—as well as those confronting wider issues, such as the self-explanatory ‘War Pigs’ and ‘Hand of Doom’.”[55] Deriving from the genre’s roots in blues music, sex is another important topic—a thread running from Led Zeppelin’s suggestive lyrics to the more explicit references of glam and nu metal bands.[56]

“Sweet Home Alabama” is probably the most well-known song by Lynyrd Skynyrd. Combining hard rock music with some touches of country as is typical in Southern rock genre, the song went to #8 on the Billboard Hot 100.

By the mid-1980s, glam metal was a dominant presence on the U.S. charts, music television, and the arena concert circuit. New bands such as L.A.’s Warrant and acts from the East Coast like Poison and Cinderella became major draws, while Mötley Crüe and Ratt remained very popular. Bridging the stylistic gap between hard rock and glam metal, New Jersey’s Bon Jovi became enormously successful with its third album, Slippery When Wet (1986). The similarly styled Swedish band Europe became international stars with The Final Countdown (1986). Its title track hit number 1 in 25 countries.[194] In 1987, MTV launched a show, Headbanger’s Ball, devoted exclusively to heavy metal videos. However, the metal audience had begun to factionalize, with those in many underground metal scenes favoring more extreme sounds and disparaging the popular style as “light metal” or “hair metal”.[195]

4 Pink Floyd Pink Floyd were an English progressive rock band formed in London. They achieved international acclaim with their progressive and psychedelic music. The band consisted of 5 members – David Gilmour (Vocals and Guitar), Syd Barrett (Vocals and Guitarist), Nick Mason (Drums), Roger Waters (Vocals and Bass), …read more.

It’s impossible not to include the Rolling Stones in this list of classic rock artists. With over 50 years in the business and still going, the Rolling Stones are obviously a living testimony to rock music’s staying power.

In 2010, Classic Rock partnered with Road Runner Record UK to publish the Classic Rock Presents: Slash. Believed to be the first magazine publisher to top an online album chart, the pioneering “Fan Pack” release gives fans in Europe Slash’s debut solo album, one month before it receives a standard release with a full 132 page magazine about Slash. The partnership marks the first-time a major album has been released exclusively with a magazine publisher, ahead of general release.

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