“classic rock harrisburg -classic rock albums released in 1971”

Hi All, if you planned on going to Frenchy’s Tavern in Roselle Park Friday January 5th to see the Memphis Rain Band, please call Frenchy’s first, because of bad weather our gig there maybe cancelled. Stay Warm and Safe!!! Memphis Rain Band

Introducing the world to hardcore southern rock, Lynyrd Skynyrd was at the top of the mountain until a plane crash in 1977 prominently influenced the band to break up. Ten years later the band reformed with the former lead singer, Ronnie Van Zant’s brothers taking over the vocal duties. –

^ New York Daily News: “A look at the most iconic guitar riffs in rock history”, published in August 10, 2016. Online: http://www.nydailynews.com/entertainment/music/iconic-guitar-riffs-rock-history-article-1.2745646

Luke Combs, Dierks Bentley, Morgan Evans, Jason Aldean With Kelly Clarkson, Chris Young, Eric Church, Frankie Ballard, Dan + Shay, Florida Georgia Line, Maren Morris, Lady Antebellum, Charles Kelley, Hunter Hayes, Blake Shelton, LANCO, Keith Urban, Sam Hunt, Kane Brown, Darius Rucker, Little Big Town, Carrie Underwood, Kenny Chesney with Grace Potter, Miranda Lambert, Kacey Musgraves, Tim McGraw, Walker McGuire, Brad Paisley with Carrie Underwood, Cam, Chris Stapleton, Thomas Rhett

Anyone can cover another artist’s song, but few are able to take that song and truly make it their own. In the case of ‘All Along The Watchtower,’ there is no doubt that Jimi Hendrix most certainly turned the Bob Dylan composition into not only a Hendrix song, but into a true classic.

Like Jane’s Addiction, many of the most popular early 1990s groups with roots in heavy metal fall under the umbrella term “alternative metal”.[256] Bands in Seattle’s grunge scene such as Soundgarden, credited as making a “place for heavy metal in alternative rock”,[257] and Alice in Chains were at the center of the alternative metal movement. The label was applied to a wide spectrum of other acts that fused metal with different styles: Faith No More combined their alternative rock sound with punk, funk, metal, and hip hop; Primus joined elements of funk, punk, thrash metal, and experimental music; Tool mixed metal and progressive rock; bands such as Fear Factory, Ministry and Nine Inch Nails began incorporating metal into their industrial sound, and vice versa, respectively; and Marilyn Manson went down a similar route, while also employing shock effects of the sort popularized by Alice Cooper. Alternative metal artists, though they did not represent a cohesive scene, were united by their willingness to experiment with the metal genre and their rejection of glam metal aesthetics (with the stagecraft of Marilyn Manson and White Zombie—also identified with alt-metal—significant, if partial, exceptions).[256] Alternative metal’s mix of styles and sounds represented “the colorful results of metal opening up to face the outside world.”[258]

Included in Pink Floyd’s rock opera, The Wall, “Another Brick in the Wall (Part 2)” spawned a single that became Pink Floyd’s only number one hit in the US, UK and other countries. Subtitled “Education,” it’s a protest song about the strict schooling in the UK, particularly as it relates to that in boarding schools. Part 2, written by bassist Roger Waters, as well as all the other “parts” of the song, contains a school choir, a searing and poignant guitar solo by David Gilmour and a disco drum beat, of all things. Members of Pink Floyd resisted making this a single, but we’ll all lucky they changed their minds.

The essence of metal drumming is creating a loud, constant beat for the band using the “trifecta of speed, power, and precision”.[25] Metal drumming “requires an exceptional amount of endurance”, and drummers have to develop “considerable speed, coordination, and dexterity … to play the intricate patterns” used in metal.[26] A characteristic metal drumming technique is the cymbal choke, which consists of striking a cymbal and then immediately silencing it by grabbing it with the other hand (or, in some cases, the same striking hand), producing a burst of sound. The metal drum setup is generally much larger than those employed in other forms of rock music.[21] Black metal, death metal and some “mainstream metal” bands “all depend upon double-kicks and blast beats”.[27]

14 Rush Rush is a Canadian progressive rock band that was formed in 1968. Even though the only founding member still in the band is Alex Lifeson (Guitar), the band is most well-known for their current members Neil Peart (Drums) and Geddy Lee (Bass, Vocals). …read more.

Listen to @blackberrysmoke’s “big, beautiful jump-blues explosion” I’ll Keep Ramblin’: http://teamrock.com/news/2018-03-23/blackberry-smoke-launch-jump-blues-explosion-ill-keep-ramblin …pic.twitter.com/2PDPiuHczy

Glam metal fell out of favor due not only to the success of grunge,[249] but also because of the growing popularity of the more aggressive sound typified by Metallica and the post-thrash groove metal of Pantera and White Zombie.[250] In 1991, the band Metallica released their album Metallica, also known as The Black Album, which moved the band’s sound out of the thrash metal genre and into standard heavy metal.[251] The album was certified 16× Platinum by the RIAA.[252] A few new, unambiguously metal bands had commercial success during the first half of the decade—Pantera’s Far Beyond Driven topped the Billboard chart in 1994—but, “In the dull eyes of the mainstream, metal was dead”.[253] Some bands tried to adapt to the new musical landscape. Metallica revamped its image: the band members cut their hair and, in 1996, headlined the alternative musical festival Lollapalooza founded by Jane’s Addiction singer Perry Farrell. While this prompted a backlash among some long-time fans,[254] Metallica remained one of the most successful bands in the world into the new century.[255]

Jump up ^ Ankeny, Jason. “Boz Scaggs – Artist Biography”. AllMusic. Retrieved 25 May 2015. One of the great blue-eyed soul singers, he started gritty but had more success when he turned toward smooth soft rock in the back half of the ’70s.

For the 91st issue (in April 2006), the magazine presented ‘The 100 Greatest British Rock Albums Ever’, which were voted for by Classic Rock staff and various people associated with rock music (including Glenn Hughes of Deep Purple and Black Sabbath fame, Lemmy of Motörhead and Francis Rossi of Status Quo). The magazine decided to let AC/DC be classed as a British act, although the band was formed in Australia. All of the band’s singers (Dave Evans, Bon Scott and Brian Johnson) and guitarists Angus and Malcolm Young are of UK descent. Led Zeppelin’s Led Zeppelin IV reached first place.

Bruce Springsteen’s official music video for ‘Glory Days’. Click to listen to Bruce Springsteen on Spotify: http://smarturl.it/BSpringSpot?IQid=BSpringGD As featured on The Album Collection, Vol. 1 (1973-1984).

In live performance, loudness—an “onslaught of sound”, in sociologist Deena Weinstein’s description—is considered vital.[10] In his book Metalheads, psychologist Jeffrey Arnett refers to heavy metal concerts as “the sensory equivalent of war”.[28] Following the lead set by Jimi Hendrix, Cream and The Who, early heavy metal acts such as Blue Cheer set new benchmarks for volume. As Blue Cheer’s Dick Peterson put it, “All we knew was we wanted more power.”[29] A 1977 review of a Motörhead concert noted how “excessive volume in particular figured into the band’s impact.”[30] Weinstein makes the case that in the same way that melody is the main element of pop and rhythm is the main focus of house music, powerful sound, timbre, and volume are the key elements of metal. She argues that the loudness is designed to “sweep the listener into the sound” and to provide a “shot of youthful vitality”.[10]

Historical retrospective collection! Rare tapes of the 70’s radio show that recorded the world’s punk bands as they crashed into San Francisco … hosted by Ruth Schwartz of Mordam Records and Tim Yohannan of Maximum Rock’n’Roll. With new intros by…

For some of those featured in the list below, fame was fleeting – though their impact certainly was not. Bands may have broken up, careers may have derailed, lives may have been tragically lost, but one thing defines these great 100 acts, some of which came and went, and others that stayed remarkably durable: They are unforgettable, a lasting part of our lives.

The greatest classic rock bands of all time embody the spirit of a generation of people who just wanted to rock. These top classic rock bands include some of the best live acts of all time and man, did they rock hard. For those who got to see these amazing classic rock bands live, you’ll surely understand how they earned the title of best classic rock band; for those who missed out, they’ll simply remain the bands you wish you could have seen live.

Down-the-back long hair is the “most crucial distinguishing feature of metal fashion”.[69] Originally adopted from the hippie subculture, by the 1980s and 1990s heavy metal hair “symbolised the hate, angst and disenchantment of a generation that seemingly never felt at home”, according to journalist Nader Rahman. Long hair gave members of the metal community “the power they needed to rebel against nothing in general”.[70]

The Greatest Guitarists Of All Time Kpop Idol Logos The Best Sophomore Albums of All Time The Greatest Tenors of All Time The Greatest Sopranos of All Time The Best Metal Songs About Missing Someone The Best Beatles Albums Current Singers You Most Wish You Could Sound Like 36 Songs You Never Realized Were About Bisexuality The Greatest Living Rock Songwriters The Best Rappers Who Started On SoundCloud The Best Hip Hop Groups of All Time Rank the Rock N Roll Hall of Fame Inductees

Don Henley of the Eagles wanted to write a song about life in Los Angeles, California, particularly its emphasis on fame, hedonism and money. Henley wrote, “It’s basically a song about the dark underbelly of the American dream and about excess in America, which is something we knew a lot about.” Henley wanted the song, decidedly somber, and played in harmonic minor, seem like an episode of the Twilight Zone, which it certainly does. Apparently the song worked on many levels, because it won the Grammy Award for Record of the Year in 1978. And the dueling guitars coda was rated the greatest guitar solo by Guitarist magazine in 1998.

In the mid-1980s, the format’s widespread proliferation came on the heels of Jacobs Media’s (Fred Jacobs) success at WCXR, in Washington, D.C., and Edinborough Rand’s (Gary Guthrie) success at WZLX in Boston. Between Guthrie and Jacobs, they converted more than 40 major market radio stations to their individual brand of classic rock over the next several years.[11]

Daryl Hall & John Oates and Train join forces for monumental co-headline summer 2018 tour. Tickets for the tour go on sale to the general public beginning Monday, January 29 at 10:00 AM CST.… more info »

Can’t believe there is no more Journey on this list than there is. I don’t think “Don’t Stop Believing” is their best song but I would be very hard pressed to pick a favorite out of their vast catalog. Even though I love Pink Floyd, the Stones, Zepp, Queen, and all the others, there’s just no way that Queen’s “The Show Must Go On” is better than every Journey song!

As the story goes, The Beatles movie needed a title, something other than Beatlemania, so the Beatles suggested a comment made by Ringo might work. Ringo had said they’ve worked so hard night and day that it’s a hard . . . day’s night, kind of a malapropism. Eureka! Then, once the producers had a title for the movie, they also needed a theme song. So John Lennon and Paul McCartney wrote it and the Beatles recorded it the next day. In July 1964, “A Hard Day’s Night,” the single and album, soared to #1 on the charts in both the US and UK, the first time a musical group had achieved such a feat.

Fashion and personal style was especially important for glam metal bands of the era. Performers typically wore long, dyed, hairspray-teased hair (hence the nickname, “hair metal”); makeup such as lipstick and eyeliner; gaudy clothing, including leopard-skin-printed shirts or vests and tight denim, leather, or spandex pants; and accessories such as headbands and jewelry.[73] Pioneered by the heavy metal act X Japan in the late 1980s, bands in the Japanese movement known as visual kei—which includes many nonmetal groups—emphasize elaborate costumes, hair, and makeup.[75]

27 The Who The Who is an English rock band formed in London, England in 1964 . The members are Roger Daltrey (lead singer), Pete Townshend (guitarist), John Entwistle (bassist), and Keith Moon (drums). They are best known for their live performances and hit songs Baba O’Riley, My Generation, and Won’t Get Fooled …read more.

Treble Hook is the party band you definitely want for your event. Playing upbeat rock/pop songs from the 80’s to today, Treble Hook will keep the party going all night long. Live band karaoke is also a fun way to get your guests involved in the fun. The person singing will have a video screen with the lyrics right on them, and a live band right behind them. With a very diverse song list, Treble Hook can also do events that require more themes like: 70’s disco party, classic/southern rock… (more)

Classic rock formulated as a radio format in the early 1980s. It features commercially successful rock music and artists / bands from the 60s to the late 80s. The format is often referred to as album-orientated rock (aor) which is defined by use of rock album tracks with a large commercial appeal.

During the late 1960s, many psychedelic singers, such as Arthur Brown, began to create outlandish, theatrical and often macabre performances; which in itself became incredibly influential to many metal acts.[125][126][127] The American psychedelic rock band Coven, who opened for early heavy metal influencers such as Vanilla Fudge and the Yardbirds, portrayed themselves as practitioners of witchcraft or black magic, using dark—Satanic or occult—imagery in their lyrics, album art, and live performances. Live shows consisted of elaborate, theatrical “Satanic rites.” Coven’s 1969 debut album, Witchcraft Destroys Minds & Reaps Souls, featured imagery of skulls, black masses, inverted crosses, and Satan worship, and both the album artwork and the band’s live performances marked the first appearances in rock music of the sign of the horns, which would later become an important gesture in heavy metal culture.[128][129] At the same time in England, the band Black Widow were also among the first psychedelic rock bands to use occult and Satanic imagery and lyrics, though both Black Widow and Coven’s lyrical and thematic influences on heavy metal were quickly overshadowed by the darker and heavier sounds of Black Sabbath.[128][129]

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