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Although this song was released by Badfinger in 1970, there is no one on earth that sings it as good as this man. Published in 1971, this love ballad epitomizes what love is all about. “I can’t live if living is without you.”

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Choice Classic Rock is a commercial-free, online-only Radio Station – streaming music from the Classic Rock decades. Expect to hear a lot of music you know – as well as music you may never have heard. You will hear hits, near hits, and lots of deep, album-only tracks originally released in the 1960’s, 1970’s and 1980’s. You will also be the first to hear new tracks from new albums released by Classic Rock artists. In this era where there is a such huge selection of entertainment to choose from, I invite you to listen to Choice Classic Rock. I have been programming this commercial-free station for[…]

Sound Opinions, the World’s only rock and roll talk show; now to go. Hosted by Jim DeRogatis of the Vocalo.org and Greg Kot of the Chicago Tribune. Each week Jim and Greg bring you the latest music news and reviews. Plus tune in to hear exclusive…

A pure classic in rock history, starts off in classic AC/DC fashion continues with timeless hard rock vocals, and that classic guitar riff that people who don’t even though what this song is knows, this is definitely a top ten pick for rock songs, without a doubt (although stairway is definitely better than this). Great contender for top three I feel, although all of these songs are great.

KRBE, an AM station in Houston, was an early classic rock radio station. In 1983 program director Paul Christy designed a format which played only early album rock, from the 1960s and early 1970s, without current music or any titles from the pop or dance side of Top 40.[9] Another AM station airing classic rock, beginning in 1983, was KRQX in Dallas-Fort Worth.[10] KRQX was co-owned with an album rock station, 97.9 KZEW. Management saw the benefit in the FM station appealing to younger rock fans and the AM station appealing a bit older. The ratings of both stations could be added together to appeal to advertisers. Classic rock soon became the widely used descriptor for the format, and became the commonly used term, among the general public, for early album rock music.

Attendees of metal concerts do not dance in the usual sense. It has been argued that this is due to the music’s largely male audience and “extreme heterosexualist ideology”. Two primary body movements used are headbanging and an arm thrust that is both a sign of appreciation and a rhythmic gesture.[77] The performance of air guitar is popular among metal fans both at concerts and listening to records at home.[78] According to Deena Weinstein, thrash metal concerts have two elements that are not part of the other metal genres: moshing and stage diving, which “were imported from the punk/hardcore subculture”.[79] Weinstein states that moshing participants bump and jostle each other as they move in a circle in an area called the “pit” near the stage. Stage divers climb onto the stage with the band and then jump “back into the audience”.[79]

Brief, abrupt, and detached rhythmic cells are joined into rhythmic phrases with a distinctive, often jerky texture. These phrases are used to create rhythmic accompaniment and melodic figures called riffs, which help to establish thematic hooks. Heavy metal songs also use longer rhythmic figures such as whole note- or dotted quarter note-length chords in slow-tempo power ballads. The tempos in early heavy metal music tended to be “slow, even ponderous”.[21] By the late 1970s, however, metal bands were employing a wide variety of tempos. In the 2000s decade, metal tempos range from slow ballad tempos (quarter note = 60 beats per minute) to extremely fast blast beat tempos (quarter note = 350 beats per minute).[26]

Heavy metal is usually based on riffs created with three main harmonic traits: modal scale progressions, tritone and chromatic progressions, and the use of pedal points. Traditional heavy metal tends to employ modal scales, in particular the Aeolian and Phrygian modes.[42] Harmonically speaking, this means the genre typically incorporates modal chord progressions such as the Aeolian progressions I-♭VI-♭VII, I-♭VII-(♭VI), or I-♭VI-IV-♭VII and Phrygian progressions implying the relation between I and ♭II (I-♭II-I, I-♭II-III, or I-♭II-VII for example). Tense-sounding chromatic or tritone relationships are used in a number of metal chord progressions.[43][44] In addition to using modal harmonic relationships, heavy metal also uses “pentatonic and blues-derived features”.[45]

This song and “Stairway to Heaven” are usually competing neck-and-neck for the greatest classic song of all time. With operatic and hard-rock influences, as well as its iconic music video, “Bohemian Rhapsody” became one of the best-selling singles in the world by the time it was released, as well as growing to become a classic rock staple.

Amazon is on it. I am blown away by how well they have their finger on the pulse of so many things, and this playlist is a prime example (pardon the pun). These songs are from my youth, and this would have been a playlist to die for when I was in high school. Loving that I can listen to all of them so easily all these years later. Thank you, Amazon.

Tried a classic alternative format in ’93 – ’94. A little soon, perhaps, but it was met with a strong positive reaction by listeners who had a modern rock station in their market but didn’t listen to them anymore because they did not like grunge. As Nirvana, Pearl Jam, Soundgarden, etc… dominated modern rock station playlists, these listeners had nowhere to go. These “80’s cutting edge” listeners were not so cutting edge anymore with the turn of the decade (not to mention, when MTV wasn’t playing grunge, they were playing rap). I have noticed that classic alternative works pretty well as a cornerstone in a Triple AAA format, but as a standalone format itself, I believe you are correct Mr. Jacobs.

Trouble? These are the kind of comments I hope we get. Wasn’t HD2 supposed to be the launching pad for dangerous, spontaneous niche radio? And I don’t care what you call them – it sure would be nice if people were buzzing about what they were listening to on the radio. Thanks for the comment, Walter.

This list tries to include some of the greatest rock tunes ever, all of which are classics; that is, songs released before the year 2000. Also keep in mind it only includes mainstream rock and roll (and we all know what that is, right?) whether soft or hard rock, but certainly not pop, R&B, soul, funk, blues, hip-hop, disco, jazz, country, bluegrass or classical – just good ol’ rock and roll, period, okay?

19 Bon Jovi Bon Jovi is a hard rock band formed in 1983, which had a streak of successful in the late 1980s. The band originally consisted of lead vocalist Jon Bon Jovi, guitarist Ritchie Sambora (left in 2013), bassist Alec John Such (left in 1994), keyboard David Bryan, and drummer Tico Torres. The band’s …read more.

The 100th issue contained all the regular features, but only one article, in which 100 names in rock were asked to write a piece on their nomination for a “rock icon”. Contributors included Brian May, Lemmy (who nominated Tina Turner, and was then himself nominated by Ian Camfield), Ian Gillan, Gary Moore, Angus Young, Phil Collins, Sebastian Bach, Peter Frampton, Jerry Cantrell, Chris Cornell, Paul Rodgers, Chad Smith, Jack Black, Zakk Wylde and Matt Bellamy.

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5 Queen Queen are an English rock band formed in 1970. Members were Freddie Mercury (Vocals and Piano), Brian May (Guitar, Vocals), Roger Taylor (Drums, Vocals), and John Deacon (Bass Guitar, Vocals). Before forming into Queen, Brian May and Roger Taylor had played together in a band named Smile. Freddie Mercury …read more.

If you missed it, no problem! Catch where all your favorite Classic Rock tunes fell on our countdown with the full Top 500 playlist below. We’d love to hear from you in the Facebook comments at the bottom of each list segment.

Inspired by Van Halen’s success, a metal scene began to develop in Southern California during the late 1970s. Based on the clubs of L.A.’s Sunset Strip, bands such as Quiet Riot, Ratt, Mötley Crüe, and W.A.S.P. were influenced by traditional heavy metal of the earlier 1970s.[187] These acts incorporated the theatrics (and sometimes makeup) of glam metal or “hair metal” such as Alice Cooper and Kiss.[188] Hair/glam metal bands were often visually distinguished by long, overworked hair styles accompanied by wardrobes which were sometimes considered cross-gender. The lyrics of these glam metal bands characteristically emphasized hedonism and wild behavior, including lyrics which involved sexual expletives and the use of narcotics.[189]

7 The Who The Who is an English rock band formed in London, England in 1964 . The members are Roger Daltrey (lead singer), Pete Townshend (guitarist), John Entwistle (bassist), and Keith Moon (drums). They are best known for their live performances and hit songs Baba O’Riley, My Generation, and Won’t Get Fooled …read more.

Here is a 2013 list of the 71 Best Rock Dance Songs for weddings or any other party where you want to dance and you want to ROCK!  These are fast-dance, booty-shaking songs from oldies to 80s rock to new rock dance songs and classic rock dance songs.  Good luck!  – All Around Raleigh DJ Company

Fred, my thought is that such a format would have the best success in a market that had a KROQ (L.A.) or 91X (S.D.) in the 80s. And it would need to be tweaked to encompass artists and songs that were big on the original station and downplay those that were bigger elsewhere.

Frank Patterson, The Irish Rovers, The Fureys & Davey Arthur, Young Dubliners, Dublin City Ramblers, Lúnasa, The Chieftains with Sinead O’Connor, The Dubliners, Altan, Sarah Moore, Sharon Shannon, The Clancy Brothers and Tommy Makem, Paddy Reilly, Ronnie Drew, Tommy Makem, Luke Kelly, The Wailin’ Jennys, The Chieftains, The Pogues

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