“classic rock magazine twitter _classic rock on xm”

LA would be one of those fascinating markets. My recollection is that it was attempted in San Diego at one point, but probably too early to be effective. Again, KM, it’s a selective thing, but very likely not a national success.

Every month in Classic Rock our High Hopes feature focusses on new bands we believe have the capability of going on to achieve big and bold things. In the past, we’ve featured Black Stone Cherry, Rival Sons, Airbourne, Cadillac 3, Halestorm, Shinedown, Alter Bridge, Royal Blood and many more.

Give us a listen. We’re sure you’ll enjoy the great songs from the 60’s, 70’s and 80’s. We’ll even throw in some 90’s for good measure. You’ll hear the great classic rock hits, and we’ll even do some deep diving into the vinyl.

Though Judas Priest did not have a top 40 album in the United States until 1980, for many it was the definitive post-Sabbath heavy metal band; its twin-guitar attack, featuring rapid tempos and a non-bluesy, more cleanly metallic sound, was a major influence on later acts.[5] While heavy metal was growing in popularity, most critics were not enamored of the music. Objections were raised to metal’s adoption of visual spectacle and other trappings of commercial artifice,[177] but the main offense was its perceived musical and lyrical vacuity: reviewing a Black Sabbath album in the early 1970s, leading critic Robert Christgau described it as “dull and amoral exploitation.”[178]

I don’t like giving most of my business to one company. That used to be called a monopoly, which I have detested for 40 years or more. However, Amazon had been the one place I can count on having what I want, delivering it in a timely manner, and having pretty good customer service. (it could be a bit better…heck I used to teach customer service). So, you won me over years ago. Adding the music option helps cement the relationship.

“Black Sabbath’s audience was…left to scavenge for sounds with similar impact. By the mid-1970s, heavy metal aesthetic could be spotted, like a mythical beast, in the moody bass and complex dual guitars of Thin Lizzy, in the stagecraft of Alice Cooper, in the sizzling guitar and showy vocals of Queen, and in the thundering medieval questions of Rainbow…. Judas Priest arrived to unify and amplify these diverse highlights from hard rock’s sonic palette. For the first time, heavy metal became a true genre unto itself.”[176]

The Doors should definitely be higher on this list. Morrison gets all the hype, but Ray Manzarek is one of the greatest musicians to play rock and roll to this date. Just listen to there last song ever recorded (Riders on the Storm) and tell me they should still be #12.

I wondered when this would happen. LA would be the perfect launching pad for this look back at the 80’s. KROQ was a huge hit in that market playing thr Ramones, Pretenders, Sex Pistols etc. it was also a darn good radio experience with a staff of interesting radio personalities and a great sense of humor.

Sometimes the best songs have the simplest licks. Guitarist Keith Richards created the main guitar lick in “Satisfaction,” a three-note riff played with a Gibson fuzzbox, which made the guitar sound like a saxophone, with which Richards hoped to replace it at some point – but the producers said no way Jose. Anyway, the song was performed live for the first time on Shindig!, an American TV show on which everything was performed live. You gotta love it! Many Boomers probably remember watching this memorable show. Not surprisingly, Rolling Stone magazine picked “Satisfaction” #2 on its list of the 500 Greatest Songs of All Time.

Watch Marilyn Manson’s new video for Tattooed In Reverse – starring Courtney Love: http://teamrock.com/news/2018-03-23/marilyn-manson-releases-tattooed-in-reverse-video-starring-courtney-love …pic.twitter.com/9ke2Wof4te

Tickets for the U2 eXPERIENCE + iNNOCENCE concert in Omaha go on sale beginning Monday, March 12th at 10am. When Saturday, May 19, 2018 8:00PM Where CenturyLink Center Omaha Ticket Information $328, $174, $109, $79 Reserved, $79 GA Pit, $44 Tickets available at all Ticketmaster retail ticket center locations, Ticketmaster charge-by-phone 1 (800) 745-3000, online…… more info »

One Reply to ““classic rock magazine twitter _classic rock on xm””

  1. The magazine focuses on established bands with credentials dating back to the 1960s. Indeed, many of the artists who have appeared on its cover are deceased (Jimi Hendrix and Phil Lynott of Thin Lizzy featured on early covers, as did bands with deceased members such as Queen and The Who).
    This is another song with a true story behind it. The name Layla relates to a book entitled The Story of Layla and Majnun, which tells the tale of Majnun, who falls in love with a beautiful young woman; but her father rejects Majnun and he goes crazy with desire. In real life, guitarist Eric Clapton, the co-writer of “Layla,” fell in love with Patty Boyd, who had married George Harrison. Eventually, though, Boyd and Harrison got a divorce and Clapton then married Boyd. How sweet! Anyway, over the years “Layla” has garnered great popular and critical acclaim. Interestingly, Both Clapton and Duane Allman of the Allman Brothers wrote and played the famous guitar licks throughout the song.

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