“classic rock radio stations streaming live |classic rock instruments”

As a specialty show, Classic Alternative has been a good Sunday morning compliment for quite a few existing Alternative stations. In some markets, I wonder if a Classic Alternative WEEKEND show might also work in a Classic Rock, Classic Hits or even an AC format (if you stick to the bigger MTV hits)?

Black Sabbath founder and guitarist Tony Iommi turns 70 today (Monday). Born in Birmingham, England, where he still lives, he started playing guitar as a teenager after being inspired by Hank Marvin of The Shadows. He sliced off the tips of fingers on his right hand while working in a metal factory but didn’t give up the guitar. He compensated by attaching…

With an ominous mood set from the first notes, we know for certain that “the storm is threatening” on the Rolling Stones’ haunting and powerful ‘Gimme Shelter.’ It’s ‘Apocalypse Now,’ in just over four minutes.

Heavy metal’s quintessential guitar style, built around distortion-heavy riffs and power chords, traces its roots to early 1950s Memphis blues guitarists such as Joe Hill Louis, Willie Johnson, and particularly Pat Hare,[108][109] who captured a “grittier, nastier, more ferocious electric guitar sound” on records such as James Cotton’s “Cotton Crop Blues” (1954);[109] the late 1950s instrumentals of Link Wray, particularly “Rumble” (1958);[110] the early 1960s surf rock of Dick Dale, including “Let’s Go Trippin'” (1961) and “Misirlou” (1962); and The Kingsmen’s version of “Louie Louie” (1963) which made it a garage rock standard.[111]

Hi all, Memphis Rain’s gig at the Liberty had a great crowd and we were joined on stage by some of our musician friends on a few songs. John Gregus thumped on the drums, Tom “Bump” McCarthy blew some blue harp while Matt Cere sang a number of rockers. Our next gig at this time is at Frenchy’s in Roselle Park Friday, June 2nd.

^ Jump up to: a b Danbury (26 May 2015). “CLASSIC ROCK’S TOP SONGS – HERE’S THE I95 MEMORIAL DAY 500 PLAYLIST”. i95 Rock. Retrieved 25 January 2018. “While you partied all weekend, i95 was playing Classic Rock’s top 500 songs. In case you missed it, here’s is our Memorial Day 500 Playlist.”

Birmingham’s Black Sabbath had developed a particularly heavy sound in part due to an industrial accident guitarist Tony Iommi suffered before cofounding the band. Unable to play normally, Iommi had to tune his guitar down for easier fretting and rely on power chords with their relatively simple fingering.[157] The bleak, industrial, working class environment of Birmingham, a manufacturing city full of noisy factories and metalworking, has itself been credited with influencing Black Sabbath’s heavy, chugging, metallic sound and the sound of heavy metal in general.[158][159][160][161] Deep Purple had fluctuated between styles in its early years, but by 1969 vocalist Ian Gillan and guitarist Ritchie Blackmore had led the band toward the developing heavy metal style.[131] In 1970, Black Sabbath and Deep Purple scored major UK chart hits with “Paranoid” and “Black Night”, respectively.[162][163] That same year, two other British bands released debut albums in a heavy metal mode: Uriah Heep with Very ‘Eavy… Very ‘Umble and UFO with UFO 1. Bloodrock released their self-titled debut album, containing a collection of heavy guitar riffs, gruff style vocals and sadistic and macabre lyrics.[164] The influential Budgie brought the new metal sound into a power trio context, creating some of the heaviest music of the time.[165] The occult lyrics and imagery employed by Black Sabbath and Uriah Heep would prove particularly influential; Led Zeppelin also began foregrounding such elements with its fourth album, released in 1971.[166] In 1973, Deep Purple released the song Smoke on the Water, with the iconic riff that’s usually considered as the most recognizable one in “heavy rock” history, as a single of the classic live album Made in Japan.[167][168]

We’ve gathered songs from sixteen of the most influential rock artists of all time, from The Beatles and The Rolling Stones to Queen and Led Zeppelin. Pick your favorite from each band’s fist-pumping anthems, hummable hits, and sing-along standards from the years spanning the ’60s to the ’80s.

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Hank Mobley And His All Stars, Art Pepper With Conte Candoli, Wynton Kelly, Paul Chambers and Jimmie Cobb, Preservation Hall Jazz Band, The Hoagy Carmichael Trio, Joe Lovano, Larry Goldings & Marvin Sewell, DoDo Green, Sherman Irby, Bobby Hutcherson, Angela McCluskey With Tryptich, Various artists, Art Blakey, Charlie Hunter, Boz Scaggs, Lena Horne, Branford Marsalis Quartet, Johnny Griffin, Billie Holiday, Takuya Kuroda Sextet, David Murray, Jack Dejohnette, Herbie Hancock, Melody Gardot, The Oscar Peterson Trio, Vince Guaraldi, Eddie Gale, Norah Jones, Ella Fitzgerald & Louis Armstrong, John Coltrane, Karl Denson, Gretchen Parlato, Bill Evans Trio, Diana Krall, Robert Glasper/King, Kenny Burrell, Bob Dylan, Madeleine Peyroux, Eric Dolphy, Curtis Fuller, Jamie Cullum, Sidney Bechet, Charles Thomas, Aruan Ortiz, Francisco Mela & Esperanza Spalding, Trombone Shorty, Jon Gordon Quintet, Tim Hagans, Bill Charlap, Larry Grenadier, Billy Drummond, Edmond Hall, Gigi Gryce / Oscar Pettiford / Kenny / Duke Jordan

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