“classic rock songs about lost love +classic rock metal”

Classic rock was borne out of a radio format that used to be named as “album oriented rock,” also known as AOR. While classic rock leans more on the whole album, “oldies” on the other hand is primarily geared towards singles that became successful on the music charts. You could say that “classic rock” is also a marketing ploy to help “immortalize” sales as well as glowing perceptive memories of rock music from the late 1960s to early 1980s.

^ Jump up to: a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q Hickey, Walt (7 Jul 2014). “Why Classic Rock Isn’t What It Used To Be”. FiveThirtyEight (ESPN Internet Ventures). Retrieved 18 January 2016. “To see what the current state of classic rock in the United States looks like, I monitored 25 classic rock radio stations1 operating in 30 of the country’s largest metropolitan areas for a week in June.2 The result, after some substantial data cleaning, was a list of 2,230 unique songs by 475 unique artists, with a total record of 37,665 coded song plays across the stations.” 2,230 song list (WebCite archive)

As we firmly move into the second half of 2017, the format ratings stories of the year are becoming clearer.  As we’ve seen in the past few years, an odd demographic pattern has been forming around both the Classic Hits and Classic Rock formats in PPM markets:

Satanic themes are common in black metal, though many bands take inspiration from ancient paganism, promoting a return to supposed pre-Christian values.[226] Numerous black metal bands also “experiment with sounds from all possible forms of metal, folk, classical music, electronica and avant-garde”.[220] Darkthrone drummer Fenriz explains, “It had something to do with production, lyrics, the way they dressed and a commitment to making ugly, raw, grim stuff. There wasn’t a generic sound.”[227]

The tritone, an interval spanning three whole tones—such as C to F#—was a forbidden dissonance in medieval ecclesiastical singing, which led monks to call it diabolus in musica—”the devil in music”.[46]

Heavy metal is usually based on riffs created with three main harmonic traits: modal scale progressions, tritone and chromatic progressions, and the use of pedal points. Traditional heavy metal tends to employ modal scales, in particular the Aeolian and Phrygian modes.[42] Harmonically speaking, this means the genre typically incorporates modal chord progressions such as the Aeolian progressions I-♭VI-♭VII, I-♭VII-(♭VI), or I-♭VI-IV-♭VII and Phrygian progressions implying the relation between I and ♭II (I-♭II-I, I-♭II-III, or I-♭II-VII for example). Tense-sounding chromatic or tritone relationships are used in a number of metal chord progressions.[43][44] In addition to using modal harmonic relationships, heavy metal also uses “pentatonic and blues-derived features”.[45]

However, the genre’s direct lineage begins in the mid-1960s. American blues music was a major influence on the early British rockers of the era. Bands like The Rolling Stones and The Yardbirds developed blues rock by recording covers of classic blues songs, often speeding up the tempos. As they experimented with the music, the UK blues-based bands—and the U.S. acts they influenced in turn—developed what would become the hallmarks of heavy metal, in particular, the loud, distorted guitar sound.[29] The Kinks played a major role in popularising this sound with their 1964 hit “You Really Got Me”.[112]

Many metal musicians when performing live engage in headbanging, which involves rhythmically beating time with the head, often emphasized by long hair. The il cornuto, or devil horns, hand gesture was popularized by vocalist Ronnie James Dio while with Black Sabbath and Dio.[44] Although Gene Simmons of Kiss claims to have been the first to make the gesture on the 1977 Love Gun album cover, there is speculation as to who started the phenomenon.[76]

The Silvertones are four piece Blues band that also does classic rock songs from the 60s, 70s, and 80s. They were founded in 1993 by Brian Wicker and Kyle Copeland. Their inaugural gig was at The Filling Station in Terrell , Texas. Like all bands, The Silvertones have had several line-up changes through the years. The Silvertones’ music, over half of which is original, reflects the various influences that the band members grew up with. It’s primarily blues, with hints of jazz, swing,… (more)

TIME LIFE and the TIME LIFE logo are registered trademarks of Time Warner Inc. and affiliated companies. Used under license by Direct Holdings Americas Inc., which is not affiliated with Time Warner Inc. or Time Inc.

Hi All, if you planned on going to Frenchy’s Tavern in Roselle Park Friday January 5th to see the Memphis Rain Band, please call Frenchy’s first, because of bad weather our gig there maybe cancelled. Stay Warm and Safe!!! Memphis Rain Band

Trouble? These are the kind of comments I hope we get. Wasn’t HD2 supposed to be the launching pad for dangerous, spontaneous niche radio? And I don’t care what you call them – it sure would be nice if people were buzzing about what they were listening to on the radio. Thanks for the comment, Walter.

The first documented use of the phrase to describe a type of rock music identified to date appears in a review by Barry Gifford. In the May 11, 1968, issue of Rolling Stone, he wrote about the album A Long Time Comin’ by U.S. band Electric Flag: “Nobody who’s been listening to Mike Bloomfield—either talking or playing—in the last few years could have expected this. This is the new soul music, the synthesis of white blues and heavy metal rock.”[95] In January 1970 Lucian K. Truscott IV reviewing Led Zeppelin II for the Village Voice described the sound as “heavy” and made comparisons with Blue Cheer and Vanilla Fudge.[96]

Heavy metal songs often make extensive use of pedal point as a harmonic basis. A pedal point is a sustained tone, typically in the bass range, during which at least one foreign (i.e., dissonant) harmony is sounded in the other parts.[47] According to Robert Walser, heavy metal harmonic relationships are “often quite complex” and the harmonic analysis done by metal players and teachers is “often very sophisticated”.[48] In the study of heavy metal chord structures, it has been concluded that “heavy metal music has proved to be far more complicated” than other music researchers had realized.[45]

Emerging in the mid-1980s with such bands as California’s Saint Vitus, Maryland’s The Obsessed, Chicago’s Trouble, and Sweden’s Candlemass, the doom metal movement rejected other metal styles’ emphasis on speed, slowing its music to a crawl. Doom metal traces its roots to the lyrical themes and musical approach of early Black Sabbath.[241] The Melvins have also been a significant influence on doom metal and a number of its subgenres.[242] Doom emphasizes melody, melancholy tempos, and a sepulchral mood relative to many other varieties of metal.[243]

^ Grow, Kory (February 26, 2010). “Final Six: The Six Best/Worst Things to Come out of Nu-Metal”. Revolver magazine. Retrieved September 21, 2015. The death of the guitar solo[:] In its efforts to tune down and simplify riffs, nu-metal effectively drove a stake through the heart of the guitar solo

Led Zeppelin defined central aspects of the emerging genre, with Page’s highly distorted guitar style and singer Robert Plant’s dramatic, wailing vocals.[155] Other bands, with a more consistently heavy, “purely” metal sound, would prove equally important in codifying the genre. The 1970 releases by Black Sabbath (Black Sabbath and Paranoid) and Deep Purple (In Rock) were crucial in this regard.[115]

Classic Rock has also published, in conjunction with Metal Hammer, special decade issues featuring 1970s (Issue I), 1980s (Issue II), and 1990s (Issue III) hard rock and metal bands, throughout 2006. In 2007, three special editions were also published with bonus DVDs for £7.50. These each focussed on one genre of rock music – first blues rock (Issue I), then progressive rock (Issue II which has now become a bi monthly magazine due to the popularity), and finally, heavy metal (Issue III). A special 2007 collectors edition bookazine was produced entitled “High Voltage”, featuring stories by Mick Wall and photographs by Ross Halfin on Jimmy Page, Ozzy Osbourne, and Axl Rose.

Journey is one of the most under rated bands. Neil Shone, Jonathan Cain & Steve Perry wrote some of Rock’s best known hit’s. Perry has been called “The Voice”. Neil Shone is as good a guitar player as any & Cain a master on keyboards. Journey is Rock & Roll!

2 Led Zeppelin Led Zeppelin were an English rock band formed in London in 1968. The group consisted of Robert Plant (Vocal), Jimmy Page (Guitar), John Paul Jones (Bass, Keyboard) and John Bonham (Drums). The band’s heavy, guitar-driven sound, rooted in blues and psychedelia on their early albums, has earned them recognition …read more.

Sponsored Products are advertisements for products sold by merchants on Amazon.com. When you click on a Sponsored Product ad, you will be taken to an Amazon detail page where you can learn more about the product and purchase it.

In 1968, the sound that would become known as heavy metal began to coalesce. That January, the San Francisco band Blue Cheer released a cover of Eddie Cochran’s classic “Summertime Blues”, from their debut album Vincebus Eruptum, that many consider the first true heavy metal recording.[132] The same month, Steppenwolf released its self-titled debut album, including “Born to Be Wild”, which refers to “heavy metal thunder” in describing a motorcycle. In July, the Jeff Beck Group, whose leader had preceded Page as The Yardbirds’ guitarist, released its debut record: Truth featured some of the “most molten, barbed, downright funny noises of all time,” breaking ground for generations of metal ax-slingers.[133] In September, Page’s new band, Led Zeppelin, made its live debut in Denmark (billed as The New Yardbirds).[134] The Beatles’ White Album, released the following month, included “Helter Skelter”, then one of the heaviest-sounding songs ever released by a major band.[135] The Pretty Things’ rock opera S.F. Sorrow, released in December, featured “proto heavy metal” songs such as “Old Man Going” and “I See You”.[136][137] Iron Butterfly’s 1968 song “In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida” is sometimes described as an example of the transition between acid rock and heavy metal[138] or the turning point in which acid rock became “heavy metal”,[139] and both Iron Butterfly’s 1968 album In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida and Blue Cheer’s 1968 album Vincebus Eruptum have been described as laying the foundation of heavy metal and greatly influential in the transformation of acid rock into heavy metal.[140]

Alice should be in the top 5 at least. I mean, he’s a badass. He’s got a great voice, killer music, and he’s a showman, which makes his concerts all the more enjoyable/interesting. Guy deserves so much more credit. I LOVE you, ALICE COOPER!

The combination of blues rock with psychedelic rock and acid rock formed much of the original basis for heavy metal.[117] The variant or subgenre of psychedelic rock often known as “acid rock” was particularly influential on heavy metal; acid rock is often defined as a heavier, louder, or harder variant of psychedelic rock,[118] or the more extreme side of the psychedelic rock genre, frequently containing a loud, improvised, and heavily distorted guitar-centered sound. Acid rock has been described as psychedelic rock at its “rawest and most intense,” emphasizing the heavier qualities associated with both the positive and negative extremes of the psychedelic experience rather than only the idyllic side of psychedelia.[119] American acid rock garage bands such as the 13th Floor Elevators epitomized the frenetic, heavier, darker and more psychotic sound of acid rock, a sound characterized by droning guitar riffs, amplified feedback, and guitar distortion, while the 13th Floor Elevators’ sound in particular featured yelping vocals and “occasionally demented” lyrics.[120] Frank Hoffman notes that: “Psychedelia was sometimes referred to as ‘acid rock’. The latter label was applied to a pounding, hard rock variant that evolved out of the mid-1960s garage-punk movement. … When rock began turning back to softer, roots-oriented sounds in late 1968, acid-rock bands mutated into heavy metal acts.”[121]

Heavy metal’s quintessential guitar style, built around distortion-heavy riffs and power chords, traces its roots to early 1950s Memphis blues guitarists such as Joe Hill Louis, Willie Johnson, and particularly Pat Hare,[108][109] who captured a “grittier, nastier, more ferocious electric guitar sound” on records such as James Cotton’s “Cotton Crop Blues” (1954);[109] the late 1950s instrumentals of Link Wray, particularly “Rumble” (1958);[110] the early 1960s surf rock of Dick Dale, including “Let’s Go Trippin'” (1961) and “Misirlou” (1962); and The Kingsmen’s version of “Louie Louie” (1963) which made it a garage rock standard.[111]

The Stones started in the business by doing covers of the American artists they admired. But eventually the Stones made their mark in the world through their own original songs such as “(I Can Get No) Satisfaction,” “Paint It Black,” “Get Off My Cloud,” and “Honky Tonk Women,” among others, which became huge chart hits. They have not only endured the changing trends of each decade, they have also integrated some of those trends and musical styles into their own music with so much success. Albums such as Out of Our Heads, Their Satanic Majesties Request, Exile on Main Street, Sticky Fingers, Through the Past Darkly, Some Girls and Tattoo You are just a handful from the Stones’ beloved vast body of work.

Death metal utilizes the speed and aggression of both thrash and hardcore, fused with lyrics preoccupied with Z-grade slasher movie violence and Satanism.[219] Death metal vocals are typically bleak, involving guttural “death growls”, high-pitched screaming, the “death rasp”,[220] and other uncommon techniques.[221] Complementing the deep, aggressive vocal style are downtuned, heavily distorted guitars[219][220] and extremely fast percussion, often with rapid double bass drumming and “wall of sound”–style blast beats. Frequent tempo and time signature changes and syncopation are also typical.[222]

Hank Mobley And His All Stars, Art Pepper With Conte Candoli, Wynton Kelly, Paul Chambers and Jimmie Cobb, Preservation Hall Jazz Band, The Hoagy Carmichael Trio, Joe Lovano, Larry Goldings & Marvin Sewell, DoDo Green, Sherman Irby, Bobby Hutcherson, Angela McCluskey With Tryptich, Various artists, Art Blakey, Charlie Hunter, Boz Scaggs, Lena Horne, Branford Marsalis Quartet, Johnny Griffin, Billie Holiday, Takuya Kuroda Sextet, David Murray, Jack Dejohnette, Herbie Hancock, Melody Gardot, The Oscar Peterson Trio, Vince Guaraldi, Eddie Gale, Norah Jones, Ella Fitzgerald & Louis Armstrong, John Coltrane, Karl Denson, Gretchen Parlato, Bill Evans Trio, Diana Krall, Robert Glasper/King, Kenny Burrell, Bob Dylan, Madeleine Peyroux, Eric Dolphy, Curtis Fuller, Jamie Cullum, Sidney Bechet, Charles Thomas, Aruan Ortiz, Francisco Mela & Esperanza Spalding, Trombone Shorty, Jon Gordon Quintet, Tim Hagans, Bill Charlap, Larry Grenadier, Billy Drummond, Edmond Hall, Gigi Gryce / Oscar Pettiford / Kenny Clarke / Duke Jordan

27 The Who The Who is an English rock band formed in London, England in 1964 . The members are Roger Daltrey (lead singer), Pete Townshend (guitarist), John Entwistle (bassist), and Keith Moon (drums). They are best known for their live performances and hit songs Baba O’Riley, My Generation, and Won’t Get Fooled …read more.

1 AC/DC AC/DC are a Australian hard rock band, formed in November 1973 by brothers Malcolm and Angus Young, who continued as members until Malcolm’s illness and departure in 2014. They were fronted by Bon Scott until his untimely death due to alcohol poisoning in 1980, after which they hired Brian Johnson to …read more.

36 Marilyn Manson Marilyn Manson is an American rock band from Fort Lauderdale, Florida. Formed in 1989 by frontman Marilyn Manson and Daisy Berkowitz, the group was originally named Marilyn & the Spooky Kids with their theatrical performances gathering a local cult following in the early 1990s. …read more.

Blaggards, The BibleCode Sundays, Gaelic Storm, The Elders, The Dreadnoughts, Young Dubliners, The Tossers, Flogging Molly, The Pogues, Enter The Haggis, Flatfoot 56, Dropkick Murphys, The Black Tartan Clan, Shilelagh Law, Black 47, The Real McKenzies, The Rumjacks, The O’Reillys and the Paddyhats, Great Big Sea, The Irish Descendants

Brad Delp is right there with Freddie Mercury in his vocal abilities, and their sound is perfect with the rest of everything else. I have more than a feeling that Boston is ranked too low on this list.

One Reply to ““classic rock songs about lost love +classic rock metal””

  1. Journey with Steve Perry really rocked. Just take a look at their live concerts on YouTube. They were the real deal – so much raw talent. Lots of people only know them for their ballads but they had lots of great rocking’ songs, too.
    During the 1980s, glam metal became popular with groups such as Mötley Crüe and Poison. Underground scenes produced an array of more aggressive styles: thrash metal broke into the mainstream with bands such as Metallica, Megadeth, Slayer, and Anthrax, while other extreme subgenres of metal such as death metal and black metal remain subcultural phenomena. Since the mid-1990s popular styles have further expanded the definition of the genre. These include groove metal (with bands such as Pantera, Sepultura, and Lamb of God) and nu metal (with bands such as Korn, Slipknot, and Linkin Park), the latter of which often incorporates elements of grunge and hip hop.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *