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The first track of The Who’s Who’s Next album is sometimes otherwise known as “Teenage Wasteland.” Taking the name from Pete Townshend’s influences, the spiritual guru Meher Baba and minimalist music genius Terry Riley, whose work was the inspiration of the song’s hypnotizingly repetitive electronic textures. It is one of The Who’s greatest legacies to classic rock.

Yup, an LA thing. Maybe a Left Coast thing, but a market almost had to support a strong Modern Rock station back in the ’80s in order to have a sufficient nostalgic base. And yes, there’s the jock/presentation piece – something that’s too easy to overlook. Thanks, Dan.

^ Jump up to: a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an ao ap aq ar as at au av aw ax ay az Johnstone, Andrew (6 February 2015). “A General Guide to Soft Rock”. Rip It Up. Archived from the original on 28 September 2015.

Ludwig van Beethoven, Francois-Joel Thiollier, Ready Baby Music!, Taneyev Quartet, Charles Gounod, John Browning, Accademia Bizantina & Carlo Chiarappa, Pachelbel’s Canon In D Major, Felix Mendelssohn, Swedish Chamber Orchestra, Mstislav Rostropovich, Artur Schnabel & Ludwig van Beethoven, Yo-Yo Ma, Antal Doráti and Philharmonia Hungarica, Peter Ilyich Tchaikovsky, Kyril Kondrashin, Moscow RTV Symphony Orchestra, John McCabe, Vladimir Ashkenazy, Alice Sara Ott, Daniel Barenboim, Johann Sebastian Bach, Alfred Brendel and Bernard Haitink and London Philharmonic Orchestra, Antonin Dvorak, Emerson String Quartet

“Baby, What a Big Surprise”[92] “Brand New Love Affair, Part I & II”[93] “Colour My World”[94] “Does Anybody Really Know What Time It Is?”[95] “Hard Habit to Break”[96] “Hard to Say I’m Sorry”[92][94][96] “If You Leave Me Now”[3][4][12][30][94] “Make Me Smile”[95] “Saturday in the Park”[95] “Will You Still Love Me?”[96] “You’re the Inspiration”[92]

Fashion and personal style was especially important for glam metal bands of the era. Performers typically wore long, dyed, hairspray-teased hair (hence the nickname, “hair metal”); makeup such as lipstick and eyeliner; gaudy clothing, including leopard-skin-printed shirts or vests and tight denim, leather, or spandex pants; and accessories such as headbands and jewelry.[73] Pioneered by the heavy metal act X Japan in the late 1980s, bands in the Japanese movement known as visual kei—which includes many nonmetal groups—emphasize elaborate costumes, hair, and makeup.[75]

11 The Jimi Hendrix Experience The Jimi Hendrix Experience was an English-American rock band that formed in Westminster, London, in September 1966. Composed of singer, songwriter, and guitarist Jimi Hendrix, bassist and backing vocalist Noel Redding, and drummer Mitch Mitchell, the band was active until June 1969. During this time …read more.

The essence of metal drumming is creating a loud, constant beat for the band using the “trifecta of speed, power, and precision”.[25] Metal drumming “requires an exceptional amount of endurance”, and drummers have to develop “considerable speed, coordination, and dexterity … to play the intricate patterns” used in metal.[26] A characteristic metal drumming technique is the cymbal choke, which consists of striking a cymbal and then immediately silencing it by grabbing it with the other hand (or, in some cases, the same striking hand), producing a burst of sound. The metal drum setup is generally much larger than those employed in other forms of rock music.[21] Black metal, death metal and some “mainstream metal” bands “all depend upon double-kicks and blast beats”.[27]

Because it has a meaning in the song. lyrics are a story. And the guitar sounds are one of a kind, and are very easy to rock out to the beat and rhythmic sounds. It’s a classic example of rock music.

2 The Beatles The Beatles were an English rock band formed in Liverpool in 1960. The members consisted of John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison and Ringo Starr. They were soon known as the foremost and most influential act of rock era. Rooted in skiffle, beat, and 1950s rock and roll, the Beatles later experimented …read more.

Appearing on The Who’s spectacular album, Who’s Next, “Won’t Get Fooled Again,” was written by guitarist Pete Townshend, who said the song seeks to make a connection between music – highlighted by the use of a synthesizer throughout the song – and the teachings of Meher Baba and Inayat Khan. Thereafter, “Won’t Get Fooled Again” became a song The Who usually played at the end of their live performances, when Townshend destroyed his guitar and Keith Moon kicked over his drums, as the crowd squealed and hooted with delight.

6 The Rolling Stones The Rolling Stones are an English rock band formed in London in 1962. The first settled line-up consisted of Brian Jones (guitar, harmonica), Ian Stewart (piano), Mick Jagger (lead vocals, harmonica), Keith Richards (guitar), Bill Wyman (bass) and Charlie Watts (drums). …read more.

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