“new classic rock magazine |classic rock birthdays august”

Judas Priest released a name generator so you can have your name or anything else spelled out like the band’s iconic logo. It was posted in conjunction with Friday’s release of the new album, Firepower. You can have a go at it at JudasPriest-NameGenerator.com In released news, a Priest pop-up store opened Friday at Sony…

Choice Classic Rock is a commercial-free, online-only Radio Station – streaming music from the Classic Rock decades. Expect to hear a lot of music you know – as well as music you may never have heard. You will hear hits, near hits, and lots of deep, album-only tracks originally released in the 1960’s, 1970’s and 1980’s. You will also be the first to hear new tracks from new albums released by Classic Rock artists. In this era where there is a such huge selection of entertainment to choose from, I invite you to listen to Choice Classic Rock. I have been programming this commercial-free station for[…]

Critical relief efforts are still going on in Florida, Texas, Mexico, Puerto Rico, and elsewhere to recover from September’s series of hurricanes and earthquakes — and this week there’s a way for you to support those efforts just by listening to music!

Hi all, Memphis Rain’s gig at the Liberty had a great crowd and we were joined on stage by some of our musician friends on a few songs. John Gregus thumped on the drums, Tom “Bump” McCarthy blew some blue harp while Matt Cere sang a number of rockers. Our next gig at this time is at Frenchy’s in Roselle Park Friday, June 2nd.

Free… And that’s all I don’t see what people are on about with the reviews, saying you need to provide credit info etc… I’ve bought stuff from the Play store before using gift visa cards so maybe that’s why I didn’t need to. 5 free songs, to keep. Great.

Are you a fan of rock music? Ever since the dawn of rock and roll in the earlier part of the 20th century, there have been thousands of rock bands and musicians entering the scene over the past decades. Yet only the greatest have endured, whose music has stood the test of time even long after they are gone and continues to inspire today’s generation.

No matter which line-up of the band you hear, the music is cohesive and stellar. David always surrounds himself with top-notch musicians. Haven’t heard a song I don’t like. Even the most recent albums sound better than anything else out at the moment. The purple album rules! I loved the Mach 3 & 4 line-up’s of deep purple. My son who is 6 years old has watched Whitesnake – made in Japan every night at bath time for over a year. Another generation of Snake fans is born!

DOWNLOAD THE FREE KSLX APP AND START STREAMING!  YOU CAN WIN A PHOTO-OP WITH ZZ TOP AT ARIZONA BIKE WEEK, FRONT-ROW SEATS FOR JETHRO TULL & A CHANCE TO MEET NIGHT RANGER AT THE MUSCLE KINGZ CAR SHOW!     Read More »

But you don’t address another point. These 80’s bands (and OF COURSE I recognized Echo & The Bunneymen, and further know that Echo was the drum machine) had some hits. But they were never “album” bands.

Artists like the Psychedelic Furs and Violent Femmes are part and parcel of the phenomenon Derdyn says could be on the verge of happening.  And in his story set-up, Cross alludes to the fact that most Classic Rock stations have beefed up ’80s music on their playlists.

KSLX Presents the MuscleKingz Car Show & Concert!  MuscleKingz, the world’s most powerful American Muscle car brand, is bringing their epic Car Show & Concert series to the Goodyear Ballpark in Goodyear, Arizona. Featuring hundreds of American Muscle Cars, the family friendly day includes performances by 38 Special, Night Ranger, Joyous Wolf and Drop Diezel on March 31. Read More »

Jump up ^ Leigh, Frederic A. (2011). “Classic Rock Format”. In Sterling, Christopher H.; O’Dell, Cary. The Concise Encyclopedia of American Radio. Routledge. p. 153. ISBN 1135176841. Retrieved August 2, 2015.

In 2010, Classic Rock partnered with Road Runner Record UK to publish the Classic Rock Presents: Slash. Believed to be the first magazine publisher to top an online album chart, the pioneering “Fan Pack” release gives fans in Europe Slash’s debut solo album, one month before it receives a standard release with a full 132 page magazine about Slash. The partnership marks the first-time a major album has been released exclusively with a magazine publisher, ahead of general release.

Earlier in the week, musicologist, radio pro, and mega-blogger Alan Cross posed today’s post title as a question in his highly entertaining blog, “A Journal of Musical Things.”  Quoting a story in the Vancouver Province by Stuart Derdeyn, the burning issue on the table is whether “Classic Alternative” is poised to be the next incarnation of Classic Rock.

The mindset underlying classic rock was regarded by Christgau as politically regressive; he said the music eschewed ironic sensibilities in favor of unintellectual, conventional aesthetics rooted in Victorian era Romanticism, while downplaying the more radical aspects of 1960s counterculture, such as race, African-American music, politics, and pop in the art sense. “Though classic rock draws its inspiration and most of its heroes from the ’60s, it is, of course, a construction of the ’70s”, he wrote in 1991 for Details magazine. “It was invented by prepunk/predisco radio programmers who knew that before they could totally commodify ’60s culture they’d have to rework it—that is, selectively distort it till it threatened no one … In the official rock pantheon the Doors and Led Zeppelin are Great Artists while Chuck Berry and Little Richard are Primitive Forefathers and James Brown and Sly Stone are Something Else.”[22] Regarding the development of classic rock, Christgau points to the compromised socioeconomic security and diminishing collective consciousness of a new generation of listeners in the 1970s and on, who succeeded rock’s early years during baby-boomer economic prosperity in the United States. “Not for nothing did classic rock crown the Doors’ mystagogic middlebrow escapism and Led Zep’s chest-thumping megalomaniac grandeur. Rhetorical self-aggrandizement that made no demands on everyday life was exactly what the times called for.”[22] Shuker attributed the rise of classic-rock radio in part to “the consumer power of the aging post-war ‘baby boomers’ and the appeal of this group to radio advertisers”. In his opinion, classic rock also produced a rock music ideology and discussion of the music that was “heavily gendered”, celebrating “a male homosocial paradigm of musicianship” that “continued to dominate subsequent discourse, not just around rock music, but of popular music more generally.”[19]

Like many English bands during the 1960s, The Who were influenced by American rock and roll, R&B, and blues music. However, they decided to change the game that set them apart from their peers — literally smashing instruments and pushing themselves musically into gargantuan proportions. The Who is one of the few bands who could be electrifying and brilliant at the same time, both during a live concert and on their records.

The variety, however, is staggering. are some defined by songs, and others by the way other artists rushed to sound just like them. A few figures trace through multiple entries, showing up alone and in larger groups. Some remained steadfast in their musical convictions, playing with a remarkable consistency; others seemed to change directions as often as they switched venues on a cross-crossing world tour. Then there are those who appear like shooting stars, burning brightly but gone far too soon.

I just saw Alice Cooper in concert (August 2016) in Huntsville AL and he was absolutely awesome! If you ever have a chance to see him, DO NOT MISS OUT! It will be the experience of a lifetime. What a show!

The electric guitar and the sonic power that it projects through amplification has historically been the key element in heavy metal.[10] The heavy metal guitar sound comes from a combined use of high volumes and heavy distortion.[11] For classic metal guitar tone, guitarists maintain moderate levels gain at moderate levels, without excessive preamp or pedal distortion, to retain open spaces and air in the music; the guitar amplifier is turned up loud to produce the characteristic “punch and grind”.[12] Thrash guitar tone has scooped mid-frequencies and tightly compressed sound with lots of bass frequencies.[12]Guitar solos are “an essential element of the heavy metal code … that underscores the significance of the guitar” to the genre.[13] Most heavy metal songs “feature at least one guitar solo”,[14] which is “a primary means through which the heavy metal performer expresses virtuosity”.[15] One exception is nu metal bands, which tend to omit guitar solos.[16] With rhythm guitar parts, the “heavy crunch sound in heavy metal … [is created by] palm muting” the strings with the picking hand and using distortion.[17] Palm muting creates a tighter, more precise sound and it emphasizes the low end.[18]

Aerosmith is still my favorite classic rock band by far, their variety in musical tone in their songs is what stands out he most from “Dude Looks Like A Lady” to “I Don’t Wanna Miss A Thing” just amazing music top to bottom!

One of the most influential acts of the 20th century. This band left its brutal mark on the music industry and metal as a whole and it is still there today. Without a doubt one of the greatest bands to have ever existed.

Kings Of Leon, The Lumineers, Gang Of Youths, Hozier, Bleachers, Lorde, Judah & the Lion, lovelytheband, AJR, Alice Merton, X Ambassadors, Portugal. The Man, Paramore, Bastille, Highly Suspect, The Revivalists, Imagine Dragons, Elle King

The guy that left the other comment on here is a complete moron! He rips AC/DC who are rock icons and puts a crappy grunge band(Nirvana), a way overrated band(Aerosmith & Pink Floyd) and a no talent band (RHCP) in his top 10? Outside of Led Zeppelin, Guns-n-Roses, & Metallica your list sucks dude! And Rush? They may be good musicians, but their music sucks! They’re the same as Primus, good musicians, crappy music!

Greatest Ever Classic Rock brings together 3 CDs of the best bands and songs the genre has to offer, from the metallic end of the spectrum (Motörhead, Judas Priest, Dio) via Southern Rock (Lynyrd Skynyrd, ZZ Top, The Allman Brothers Band) and British stalwarts (Thin Lizzy, Mott The Hoople) to radio and road-friendly offerings by the likes of The Pretenders, The Cars and Foreigner. Comprising 59 storming tracks from the rock canon, Greatest Ever Classic Rock is an essential companion for rock fans of any age.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *