“top classic acoustic rock 70 80 90 +classic rock songs about love”

By the middle of the 70s — when guitarists Don Felder and Joe Walsh joined the lineup — the Eagles became one of the biggest bands on the planet. In 1977, their album Hotel California went to #1 on the US Billboard 200 and in many parts of the world, selling over 16 million copies in the US alone. In the early 1980s the Eagles split due to animosity among the band members, but in 1994 they reunited and since then they’ve been busy with a series of tours and records up to the current time.

Former owner TeamRock bought Metal Hammer, Prog and Classic Rock from Future PLC in 2013.[3] On 19 December 2016, TeamRock called in the administrators with the loss of 73 jobs, after experiencing financial difficulties, and suspended publication of all three titles.[4] On 8 January 2017, Classic Rock, along with sister magazines Metal Hammer and Prog, were bought by previous owners Future Publishing for £800,000, and resumed publishing.[5]

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The combination of blues rock with psychedelic rock and acid rock formed much of the original basis for heavy metal.[117] The variant or subgenre of psychedelic rock often known as “acid rock” was particularly influential on heavy metal; acid rock is often defined as a heavier, louder, or harder variant of psychedelic rock,[118] or the more extreme side of the psychedelic rock genre, frequently containing a loud, improvised, and heavily distorted guitar-centered sound. Acid rock has been described as psychedelic rock at its “rawest and most intense,” emphasizing the heavier qualities associated with both the positive and negative extremes of the psychedelic experience rather than only the idyllic side of psychedelia.[119] American acid rock garage bands such as the 13th Floor Elevators epitomized the frenetic, heavier, darker and more psychotic sound of acid rock, a sound characterized by droning guitar riffs, amplified feedback, and guitar distortion, while the 13th Floor Elevators’ sound in particular featured yelping vocals and “occasionally demented” lyrics.[120] Frank Hoffman notes that: “Psychedelia was sometimes referred to as ‘acid rock’. The latter label was applied to a pounding, hard rock variant that evolved out of the mid-1960s garage-punk movement. … When rock began turning back to softer, roots-oriented sounds in late 1968, acid-rock bands mutated into heavy metal acts.”[121]

What’s the recipe for becoming one of the Top 100 classic rock artists? It takes sweeping influence, longevity, groundbreaking importance and a certain indelible quality. But being a huge presence doesn’t necessarily mean that all of these qualities must be present at once.

1 Led Zeppelin Led Zeppelin were an English rock band formed in London in 1968. The group consisted of Robert Plant (Vocal), Jimmy Page (Guitar), John Paul Jones (Bass, Keyboard) and John Bonham (Drums). The band’s heavy, guitar-driven sound, rooted in blues and psychedelia on their early albums, has earned them recognition …read more.

CLASSIC CUTS: Free Bird    Lynyrd Skynyrd: “Free Bird” The Hook: Easier to learn than you’d think. Album: (Pronounced ‘Lĕh-‘nérd ‘Skin-‘nérd) Year: 1973 Writers: Allen Collins and Ronnie Van Zant Stats: An edited version became Skynyrd’s second Top 20 hit, peaking at number-19 on the Billboard Hot 100. Background: Lynyrd Skynyrd guitarist Ricky Medlocke was the group’s drummer in 1970 and ’71, before they had a recording contract.…

5 Queen Queen are an English rock band formed in 1970. Members were Freddie Mercury (Vocals and Piano), Brian May (Guitar, Vocals), Roger Taylor (Drums, Vocals), and John Deacon (Bass Guitar, Vocals). Before forming into Queen, Brian May and Roger Taylor had played together in a band named Smile. Freddie Mercury …read more.

For some of those featured in the list below, fame was fleeting – though their impact certainly was not. Bands may have broken up, careers may have derailed, lives may have been tragically lost, but one thing defines these great 100 acts, some of which came and went, and others that stayed remarkably durable: They are unforgettable, a lasting part of our lives.

Musicians better than most of their peers, one of the best front man ever and lyrics socially relevant on a higher intellectual level than the dungeons and dragons fantasy lyrics of groups like Led Zeppelin. The doors are the greatest band of all times!

Over the years my taste in music has been redefined many times. It all came to a rest at Queen. The pure musicianship of every single member of this amazing band shows that they are the greatest band ever. Each member is credited for writing at least one #1 hit, even the bass and drummer. That is no surprise when you look at each one though. John Deacon has some of the most iconic bass lines ever. Roger Taylor with his intricate drum fills and an incredible voice which could have (and did) front a band of his own.

First played by Richard Berry and the Pharaohs, “Louie Louie” is one of the most played rock tunes of all time. In the old days, this was usually the first tune learned by rock guitarists (the chords A, D, Em,D). Often considered a dirty song, though it isn’t – but you know how inventive kids can be – a seemingly endless number of bands have covered this song, often adding a guitar or saxophone solo, but The Kingsmen in 1963 may have produced the most popular version, though the lyrics are barely intelligible, as they often are in rock songs.

This year Brothers Osborne return under their own steam. Their new album is scheduled for release in the spring via Snakefarm Records, and they undertake a headline UK tour in May. “The UK has become one of our favourite places to play,” enthuses John Osborne. “We’re thrilled to be doing our first ever headline tour there in May. Can’t wait!”

The rhythm in metal songs is emphatic, with deliberate stresses. Weinstein observes that the wide array of sonic effects available to metal drummers enables the “rhythmic pattern to take on a complexity within its elemental drive and insistency”.[21] In many heavy metal songs, the main groove is characterized by short, two-note or three-note rhythmic figures—generally made up of 8th or 16th notes. These rhythmic figures are usually performed with a staccato attack created by using a palm-muted technique on the rhythm guitar.[36]

U2 is one of the best bands ever! With or Without You, One, Where the Streets Have No Name… Really guys. Lots of the higher-ranked bands are mildly painful to listen to. U2 has way more good songs than some of those bands. Bono is the best, the Edge is fabulous on guitar. If you really listen to some of their songs, not just their most recent album, you would agree with me.

They were highly regarded by very positioned and prestigious musicians 40 years ago and now they are revered as the greatest musicians of all time by not their fans but by the most credible critic’s… Real iconic musicians that do not have one small complaint. Who dare would cast doubt on the greatest musicians of all time hand’s down. Rush humbly continues to be even better after 47 years… No other act on the entire list can lay claim to that longevity of commercial success… No one… Not even close no matter how l9ng you try to explain… Rush is still there turning out new and full studio albums then backing them up with sold out shows at the highest dollar around the world… Beatles never done that… Stones never done that… U2 never done that… Acdc never done that… Aerosmith never done that… Metallic never done that… Maiden never done that… Hendrix never done that cream never done that the who never done that… Only one I would consider close would be Neil …more

The thematic content of heavy metal has long been a target of criticism. According to Jon Pareles, “Heavy metal’s main subject matter is simple and virtually universal. With grunts, moans and subliterary lyrics, it celebrates … a party without limits … [T]he bulk of the music is stylized and formulaic.”[7] Music critics have often deemed metal lyrics juvenile and banal, and others[57] have objected to they see as advocacy of misogyny and the occult. During the 1980s, the Parents Music Resource Center petitioned the U.S. Congress to regulate the popular music industry due to what the group asserted were objectionable lyrics, particularly those in heavy metal songs.[58] Andrew Cope states that claims that heavy metal lyrics are misogynistic are “clearly misguided” as these critics have “overlook[ed] the overwhelming evidence that suggests otherwise”.[59] Music critic Robert Christgau called metal “an expressive mode [that] it sometimes seems will be with us for as long as ordinary white boys fear girls, pity themselves, and are permitted to rage against a world they’ll never beat”.[60]

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