“classic rock examples +70s classic rock bands still touring”

16 Van Halen Van Halen is an American hard rock band formed in Pasadena, California, in 1972. From 1974 until 1985, the band consisted of guitarist Eddie Van Halen, vocalist David Lee Roth, drummer Alex Van Halen, and bassist Michael Anthony.

It is during the band’s golden era with Perry when the band enjoyed million-selling records — and that included seven consecutive multi-platinum albums such as their most famous Escape (1981) — sold-out concerts, and songs that have become the staple of classic rock. After Perry left the band, the group recruited Arnel Pineda and went on to score million-selling albums such as Revelation (2008) and Eclipse (2011). And it seems that Journey’s road to success isn’t letting up just yet.

2 Led Zeppelin Led Zeppelin were an English rock band formed in London in 1968. The group consisted of Robert Plant (Vocal), Jimmy Page (Guitar), John Paul Jones (Bass, Keyboard) and John Bonham (Drums). The band’s heavy, guitar-driven sound, rooted in blues and psychedelia on their early albums, has earned them recognition …read more.

For instance, the song “Going For The One” was a good song and had moderate success on the radio during that time. YES had a whole host of songs with similar recognition, which is more than most of the bands on this list.

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Marillion release video footage of their performance of Seasons End track The Space – taken from upcoming live package All One Tonight: http://teamrock.com/news/2018-03-22/watch-marillion-perform-the-space-at-the-royal-albert-hall …pic.twitter.com/DhqZSe18mh

Music scholar Jon Stratton traced classic rock’s origins to the emergence of a classic-rock canon.[20] This canon arose in part from music journalism and superlative lists ranking certain albums and songs that are consequently reinforced to the collective and public memory.[21] Robert Christgau said the classic-rock concept transmogrified rock music into a “myth of rock as art-that-stands-the-test-of-time”, and believed the canonizing of certain rock artists by critics, major media, and music establishment entities such as the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame was inevitable.[22] Media academic Roy Shuker said classic-rock radio programmers largely play “tried and proven” hit songs from the past based on their “high listener recognition and identification”; he identified white male rock acts from the Beatles’ Sgt. Pepper era through the end of the 1970s as the focus of their playlists.[19] As Catherine Strong observed, classic rock songs are generally performed by white male acts from either the United States or the United Kingdom, “have a four-four time, very rarely exceed the time limit of four minutes, were composed by the musicians themselves, are sung in English, played by a ‘classical’ rock formation (drums, bass, guitar, keyboard instruments) and were released on a major label after 1964.”[21]

This song by Aerosmith is included in their album Toys in the Attic which gave the band the breakthrough success they aspired. It still rocks to high heaven, even 40 years after it was first released.

Heavy metal’s quintessential guitar style, built around distortion-heavy riffs and power chords, traces its roots to early 1950s Memphis blues guitarists such as Joe Hill Louis, Willie Johnson, and particularly Pat Hare,[108][109] who captured a “grittier, nastier, more ferocious electric guitar sound” on records such as James Cotton’s “Cotton Crop Blues” (1954);[109] the late 1950s instrumentals of Link Wray, particularly “Rumble” (1958);[110] the early 1960s surf rock of Dick Dale, including “Let’s Go Trippin'” (1961) and “Misirlou” (1962); and The Kingsmen’s version of “Louie Louie” (1963) which made it a garage rock standard.[111]

During the 1980s, glam metal became popular with groups such as Mötley Crüe and Poison. Underground scenes produced an array of more aggressive styles: thrash metal broke into the mainstream with bands such as Metallica, Megadeth, Slayer, and Anthrax, while other extreme subgenres of metal such as death metal and black metal remain subcultural phenomena. Since the mid-1990s popular styles have further expanded the definition of the genre. These include groove metal (with bands as Pantera, Sepultura, and Lamb of God) and nu metal (with bands such as Korn, Slipknot, and Linkin Park), the latter of which often incorporates elements of grunge and hip hop.

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